Best Xerostomia Treatment

Xerostomia: Causes and Treatment

Are you suffering from Xerostomia (dry mouth)? Xerostomia refers to a dry, dry mouth that is caused by medication, radiation therapy or salivary gland dysfunction. You have many options to increase saliva production and improve your quality of life. We will be discussing both non-surgical and surgical options for Xerostomia today.

What is Xerostomia?

Xerostomia, a medical term meaning dry mouth, is defined as a condition that causes the mouth to become dry. A dry mouth means that saliva flow is limited.

Why is Saliva Production Important?

A xerostomia patient's saliva is vital because it helps to digest food. It protects the mouth, teeth, and throat against disease-causing bacteria, that may lead to gingivitis, periodontal, and other conditions. You can try this out

What exactly are the Signs of Dry Mouth

It is vital to diagnose dry mouth in order to prevent tooth decay. Dry mouth is when your saliva production is reduced. They are the symptoms of dry mouth:

  • A thick and stringy mouth.
  • You might have used mouthwash to dry your tongue.
  • The tongue sticks to the roof of the mouth.
  • Problems with dry food
  • Bad breath
  • Ulcers
  • Dry and chapped lips
  • Sensitivity to oral thrush infections
  • Tooth decay
  • Has the aroma of a frog

What exactly are the Causes of Dry Mouth?

It is very important to determine the root causes of dry lips to avoid tooth decay.

Unwanted effects of certain medications:

Based on the American Dental Association, dry mouth can result from many prescription and unprescription drugs. Dry mouth could be caused primarily by medicines such as antihistamines (decongestants), antidepressants, pain medication (disease modifier agents), and antidepressants.

Unwanted effects of Certain Infections and Diseases

Based on the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCOR), dry mouth and tooth loss are side effects of medical conditions. Sjogren’s syndrome, HIV/AIDS and diabetes are a number of the medical conditions.

Unwanted effects of Certain Medical Treatments

Dry mouth can be caused by harm to the salivary system. Patients are often hesitant to seek treatment or worried about their teeth's health. The damage could possibly be caused by improper oral surgery, radiotherapy for cancer patients, chemotherapy treatments, or radiation.

Oral Mucosa

Many people experiencing dry mouth are due to damage to their oral health during radiation therapy. Prior to going through any chemotherapy, head or neck cancer surgery, it is important to have your gums, teeth, and other surgeries checked with a dentist.

Dehydration

Dry mouth can result from sweating and nausea, diarrhea, blood losses, burns up, and unwanted weight loss. Dry mouth can result from the reduction of salivary flow by the major salivary glands.

Sugary foods

High intakes of soda, dry foods, spicy and acidic foods could cause mouth dryness in many people. Drinking lots of water is a good idea, along with soft eatables and moist foods abundant with moisture. This will help prevent salivary dysfunction.

Surgery of the Salivary Glands

Dry mouth may also result from removing salivary cells.

Xerostomia Treatment:

There are numerous non-surgical possibilities for dry mouth treatment.

  • To moisten the mouth, make use of a prescription toothpaste. It could stimulate saliva flow, relieve dry mouth symptoms, such as for example cracked lips, bleeding gums and difficulty speaking.
  • You might have dry lips if you take a medicine which has side effects. Your physician may be able modify the dosage, prescribe something else or give fluoride gel to greatly help.
  • When you have a reduced production of saliva due to increased risk factors, your doctor or dentist might prescribe artificial saliva replacements. Saliva substitutes, such as for example mouthwashes or saliva sprays, mimic the natural function of saliva. They offer moisture to the inside and outside of the mouth area. Click here now
  • Use fluoride toothpaste for dry teeth or calcium supplements. Speak to your dentist to find out more.
  • To take care of an infected area, you should use antibiotics or antifungal medications such as orally administered medication vi. Minor surgery is often used to treat salivary gland obstructions such as stones.

These therapies may possibly not be effective. Other surgical and non-surgical options may be necessary. It might also include treatment for an underlying condition like Sjogren’s Syndrome or diabetes.

They are just a few of the other non-surgical treatment options.

Sugarless Chews & Lozenges

For dryness, you are able to relieve it by chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless candies and Lozenges.

Sugar-Free Gum

You are able to chew sugar-free gum because this nicotine gum has xylitol. This oral medicine really helps to prevent cavities. Sugar-free gum will not contain xylitol. This ingredient can cause vomiting and nausea.

Sugar-Free Candy

There are also xylitol in sugar-free candy or sugar-free pops. It can help restore saliva.

Lozenges:

If your teeth are not cleaned regularly, you should use xylitol to lessen the bacteria that causes cavities, bad breath or gum disease.

You are able to stop drying your skin.

Get plenty of water

You can begin your day by drinking one glass of water. Continue steadily to drink it throughout the day. Drink water at meals to create chewing and swallowing easier. Keep hydrated by drinking at least eight glasses each day.

Cool Mist Humidifier

It is critical to immediately treat dry mouth. You can do this by placing a cup full of water beside your bed, or setting up a humidifier in the room.

Breathe your nose:

Sleep issues can be due to mouth breathing. This is because salivary output falls to its lowest circadian level. You are able to prevent dry mouth by breathing throughout your nose.

Use Xylitol

Xylitol can prevent cavities and stimulate saliva flow. This assists with the salivation problems associated with Xerostomia. In addition, it has antimicrobial capabilities that prevent plaque buildup from teeth during the day.

Avoid:

  • Dry mouth can result from taking over-the-counter medication, like decongestants or antihistamines.
  • Stop drinking caffeinated beverages, smoking and dry mouth.
  • Usually do not smoke to take care of dryness of the mouth.

Procedures for Surgery

A procedure can be carried out to treat dry mouth. This might include creating ducts in the gland to bring saliva in the mouth, or replacing salivary glands with extra glands extracted from the lower or inside the mouth.

A temporary sialogogue injection or labyrinthectomy are two options for surgical dry mouth treatment. If it is not done correctly, it can cause serious damage to patients' oral health.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy can be used to treat dry mouth. High-dose radiation can be used to treat dry mouth. This radiation damages the salivary glands. Although xerostomia symptoms may not improve in a matter of weeks or months, they can be completely eliminated in certain cases.

For patients with previous cancer, doctors do not recommend radiation treatment for dry mouth.

Salivary stimulants:

The mouth becomes dry due to the use of salivary stimulants. This dry mouth treatment uses xylitol, an oral medication that increases saliva production. You can also apply it topically or inject it directly into your salivary glands.

Systemic Sialogogues

Systemic sialogogues, which are dry mouth treatments that use pills to increase saliva production, are known as dry mouth treatments. This xerostomia treatment stimulates the salivary glands by stimulating them to work.

Conclusion

A Xerostomia specialist can diagnose patients with true salivary dysfunction using effective diagnostic criteria and functional testing. There are no universal treatment guidelines, but many options are available to manage the problem. Topical agents can be used to treat and prevent Xerostomia. This document summarizes the treatment options and diagnoses for this condition.